Grand Bahama Island sunset with Palm Trees

Posted by: carmel | September 22nd, 2019

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, September 22, 2019…. Just over two weeks have passed since Hurricane Dorian, the second strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic and the strongest hurricane ever recorded in The Bahamas, impacted Grand Bahama Island.

The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) is the Bahamian government agency coordinating the relief and recovery response. The first phase of the emergency management response centered on immediate activities such as search and rescue, rapid damage and needs assessments, and the provision of first aid. A critical partner in this effort was the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), which deployed a Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) to partner with NEMA at the request of The Bahamas Government.

The next phase is focused on restoring basic services and

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Posted by: carmel | August 30th, 2019

Updated Friday, September 13, 2019

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND BEGINS THE JOURNEY TO RECOVERY FOLLOWING THE PASSAGE OF HURRICANE DORIAN

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, September 13, 2019…. Hurricane Dorian passed over the Northwestern Bahamas on Monday, September 2nd through Tuesday, September 3rd. The unprecedented Category 5 Hurricane generated180 miles per hour winds, and 200 mile an hour gusts, and brought heavy rains island wide, storm surges (18-25 feet) and widespread flooding before departing. Tragically, the Commissioner of the Royal Bahamas Police Force has advised that to date, eight persons have lost their lives, and many more are still presumed missing.

The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) is the Bahamian government agency coordinating the relief and recovery response. Grand Bahama Island has been severely impacted by the storm, with thousands of homes and businesses

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Posted by: Meshell Britton | March 14th, 2019

Fritters. Conch Fritters to be exact. It’s the only thing running on a loop in my mind. Until I actually feel my teeth break through the delicate crunch of a crust that protects the fluffy goodness within, I won’t be content. The closer I get to the entrance the faster the loop plays. It’s 6pm on a Wednesday and I’m at Smith’s Point. It’s a quaint settlement in Grand Bahama, better known as the home to The Bahamas’ first Fish Fry. I’m here early enough that I can avoid a crowd but it’s just enough time for me to rock out on my own at Penny’s. My favorite fish fry stall.

[caption id="attachment_2613" align="aligncenter" width="406"] Penny's, Smith's Point Fish Fry, Grand Bahama Island[/caption]

It’s early. I’ve said this already but anyone that shows up at Fish Fry earlier than usual won’t be greeted at Penny’s with the traditional rhythm of rake and scrape. Not

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